Return to Civilization

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One shovel test – down to 85 cm.

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One excavation block were we dug 8 units, most of the microblades came from the corner they’re working in

The last couple of days in the Yukon were good; we finished up our excavation units, refilled them and had a slacker day around camp before flying back to Whitehorse. We didn’t find anything else terribly exciting, but that’s the way it goes sometimes.

Most of the cultural material (points and artefacts) came out of the top 30 to 40 cm of sediment but one of our shovel tests had a random bone at 75 cm below surface – just one perfectly intact tibia….thus we had to take all of our shovel tests and excavation units down that deep, or even deeper (some went to a meter). This seemed a bit drastic but at least four of our units had nothing until the 75 cm point and then we found 1 bone in each unit, most curious and annoying – I feel like it was just one random animal that decided to die all the way across our site.

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Al’s expert hands at work

The last day at the camp was fun though, well aside from tackling the mountain of dirty field clothes. We were given permission, and some quads, to go gold panning for the afternoon! Apparently this is called sniping – you are allowed to pan for gold without a claim in order to see if there is anything in the area. Luckily, we had Al, a toothless older gentleman mechanic on the mountain who used to have his own gold claim and business, show us which sediment we should be panning and how to do it. As with all things, he made it look quick and easy. It involves a lot of swirling and continually dipping the pan in and out of the river, when I tried I felt like I wIMG_4240as floating any gold I might have had downstream, I also couldn’t figure out how he magically made all of his rocks disappear from the pan. In the end, we did find some tiny flakes which I now have in a preposterously large ziplock bag, I also brought home a sandwich-sized bag of sediment that needs to be panned still, hopefully my fortune is in that bag!

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The moccasin

After that excitement, we flew back to Whitehorse and stayed the night. Before our last plane ride home we went to the archaeology branches’ main repository for an early morning visit. We took along some of the cool stuff we had found and the woman was able to help us pin down some tentative dates for when the tools would have been used (as early as 12,000 BP!), and then she showed off some of the amazing things that have been found in the Yukon, especially on the ice patches. Normally we don’t see a lot of organic material because it breaks down too quickly but the ice fields have freeze-dried a lot of wooden and leather items. They also have the oldest moccasin there, they have arrowheads still in their shafts, spear shafts, a spear point made from an antler tine – so many cool things. They also had some dinosaur bones (I know we don’t do dinos but I still think they’re awesome), and they have an impressive collection of megafauna bones – mammoth bones!

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An antler that would have had microblades inserted into the cut along the bottom edge (x-rays show that there are still broken pieces inside), there is also a unique character carved onto the top edge – thought to help identify who owned which weapon

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A broken point, sinew and wooden shaft

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Mammoth bones!
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4 responses to “Return to Civilization

  1. I do not even know how I ended up here, but I thought this post was great. I dont know who you are but certainly you are going to a famous blogger if you arent already 😉 Cheers!

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